Algoma Deanery Week of June 3rd

Good day!

Tuesday, June 4th is the Farewell Dinner for The Rev. Rick Reed and his family, The Verdi Ballroom, 455 Queen St. E.; doors open at 5pm, dinner at 6pm. Marilyn has tickets…705-254-3974.

Wednesday, June 5th is the Games Afternoon for Seniors, the Legion Lounge in Richards Landing, 1-3pm. Join us for card games, board games, knitting, crocheting, chit-chatting….

Wednesday, June 5th is also St. Saviour’s Strawberry Tea and Bake Sale (32 Michigan Ave., Blind River); 6:30-8pm.

Thursday, June 6th is the White Elephant at Holy Trinity, SSM (352 Northern Ave. E.) 10:30am-1pm.

Saturday, June 8th is the Parish of St. Joseph & St. George ACW Spring Tea, St. George’s, Echo Bay (159 Church St.); 1-3pm.

For Your Devotions:

Monday, June 3rd is is the memorial of Janani Luwum, Archbishop of Uganda, died 1977 and The Martyrs of Uganda, 1886. One of the most influential clergy in Africa, Archbishop Janani is remembered each year in Uganda (on Feb.16) with a public holiday during which schools, offices, and businesses are closed. He was an outspoken opponent of President Idi Amin and delivered a note protesting unexplained disappearances and deaths. This led to his arrest along with two cabinet ministers. The three men were placed on display at a presidential rally and then, allegedly, died in a car crash on their way back to prison. However, his family reports that, when they retrieved his body, he had been shot in the mouth and chest. Archbishop Janani was declared a martyr by Canterbury Cathedral/Church of England. To read more about his life…  https://publicholidays.ug/archbishop-janani-luwum-day/

The Martyrs of Uganda: Over the span of about 15 months, Mwanga (ruler of Buganda – now Uganda) ordered the brutal murders of 45 Anglicans and Roman Catholics. Anglican and Roman Catholic missionaries and converts were bludgeoned and beheaded. A group of young pages working in the royal household were burned alive when Mwanga discovered they had been taught Christian doctrines.  Soldiers, officials, judges… no one was safe. Christian persecution seems hard to fathom from where we comfortably sit but it’s actually on the rise around the world. North Korea tops the list of dangerous countries for Christians and “ethnic nationalism” is becoming a major driving force of persecution.   If you’d like to read more:   https://www.britannica.com/event/Martyrs-of-Uganda

Tuesday, June 4th is the commemoration of Pope John XXIII, Bishop of Rome, Reformer, died 1963.  Why do Anglicans commemorate a Roman Catholic Bishop?…In his openness to change, he convoked the Second Vatican Council which reformed the Roman Catholic Church and sent ripples of influence through all mainstream denominations. His life is fascinating… born poor, the oldest son of 13, sent off at age 11 to become a priest…He never used his position to benefit his family and bequeathed each living member of his family just $20 at his death – the sum total of his personal fortune. To read more about this: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Saint-John-XXIII

Wednesday, June 5th is the memorial of missionary and martyr, Boniface of Mainz, died 754. He was born, named Wynfrid, around 675 AD, into a noble English family but chose to become a Benedictine monk and then priest. He turned down the position of abbot in order to instead risk his life as the “apostle of Germany”. He was murdered by pagans as he read the Scriptures to Christian novices on Pentecost Sunday in 754 AD. More info:  https://www.britannica.com/biography/Saint-Boniface

Thursday, June 6th is the commemoration of William Grant Broughton, First Anglican Bishop in Australia, died 1853. William’s extensive literary research earned him a reputation because, at the time, not much Anglican scholarly writing was being produced. This was a big factor in why William was noticed and chosen to be bishop. He actually reluctantly accepted the position on the condition that it would be short…He ended up spending the rest of his life in Australia. William took seriously the fact that he was head of the national church and set up pastoral and educational opportunities for all the people – convicts, Aboriginal peoples, and settlers alike. It’s an interesting read if you’d like to learn more:   http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/broughton-william-grant-1832

Have a wonderful week!

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